Parents of some pupils at a troubled Walsall special school are still home schooling their children following its sudden closure last month.

A report to Walsall Council's education overview and scrutiny committee, which meets on Tuesday (March 26), sets out a number of actions being delivered to improve The Jane Lane School.

The school was closed suddenly last month due to staff shortages resulting in concerns for the safety of its 146 students. This came just weeks after a damning Ofsted report had placed Jane Lane in special measures.

Parents demonstrated outside Walsall Council House demanding information on issues at problem hit Jane Lane School.
Parents demonstrated outside Walsall Council House demanding information on issues at problem hit Jane Lane School.
 

Parents held a protest outside Walsall Council House demanding more information amid claims they were not being kept informed over what was happening at the school.

Since then, the authority has put an action plan in place with all secondary school aged pupils now returned.

Many primary school-aged youngsters were temporarily placed in other schools but the committee will be told that some are being home-schooled due to their complex needs. They expect to have most returned to Jane Lane by the end of this term.

Post-16 students were offered alternative placements and training placements at providers including Walsall College.

The report said an acting head teacher, along with two deputies and two assistant heads, were also brought in to support the existing head and bolster the staff team.

The Jane Lane School in Walsall. PIC: Google Street View.
The Jane Lane School in Walsall. PIC: Google Street View.

It said: "All pupils remain on roll of The Jane Lane School and plans are in place to bring back the primary pupils as soon as possible.

"The transition plan for primary pupils to return is school is aimed at having most, if not all pupils back on site before the end of term.

"For post 16 students who may settle into alternative courses, there may need to be further discussion as to whether it would be better for them to remain with their temporary providers until courses are completed.

 

"Because of the complex nature of some children’s needs and disruption already experienced, some parents have chosen to educate their children at home.

"The local authority is supporting these families to ensure that they can provide an appropriate education and that regular welfare visits are undertaken.

"The Early Help Team have identified those who might need help and ensured that this is provided."