New taxes to help pay for the Commonwealth Games in Birmingham are unlikely to be introduced, it has been revealed.

No official cost has been announced for the 2022 event, though estimates put the price at around £750 million.

Birmingham City Council will be required to fund around a quarter of this - £184.7 million - and has recently been looking at ways of funding its share of the costs.

It is thought that partner contributions from organisations such as the West Midlands Combined Authority will make up for £75 million of the total, with £19.7 million from existing capital resources and a further £50 million being borrowed by the council.

An artist's impression of Alexander Stadium in Birmingham after its transformation for the 2022 Commonwealth Games, the third time England has been chosen to host the event
An artist's impression of Alexander Stadium in Birmingham after its transformation for the 2022 Commonwealth Games, the third time England has been chosen to host the event
 

But this still leaves a funding gap of approximately £40 million, with the council floating several ideas for potential taxation schemes to raise the money in recent months.

In a report heard this week (Monday) at the Resources Overview and Scrutiny Committee, it was suggested that none of the options on the table are likely to get the go-ahead.

The four main options on the table for the council were raising the money from supplementary business rates, introducing a workplace parking levy, introducing a hotels tax or introducing an airport tax .

However, the report notes that raising the funds through business "is now considered highly unlikely", due to the lack of support from local businesses, while it also found that the introduction of a workplace parking levy could take 3 to 5 years to implement, and would therefore take too long.

Artist’s impression of proposed Commonwealth Games Aquatic Centre.
Artist’s impression of proposed Commonwealth Games Aquatic Centre.
 

Of the other two options, a hotels tax is unlikely "given the likely high levels of industry resistance, and the need for legislation", the report notes, while an airport levy is also unlikely as it would need the support of airport bosses, who would not necessarily see any immediate benefits by asking its customers to pay extra.

Each of the ideas were dismissed by Conservative councillor Meirion Jenkins, who said that people are already paying too much in tax.

"I think these are all terrible ideas," he said.

"I think that you have to look at the overall burden of taxation. We're at the highest level of taxes in 50 years, in terms of the hotels we already pay 20 per cent tax when you book a hotel. We can't increase above that.

A CGI image of how the entire Commonwealth Games 2022 athletes village will look.
A CGI image of how the entire Commonwealth Games 2022 athletes village will look.
 

"If you're flying abroad, we already pay a very high air passenger duty, and the airport tax would be on top of that. And when you look at the overall burden of taxation it's just wholly wrong to start imposing these extra burdens, because that's in effect what they are.

"And it was said that the taking on of the Commonwealth Games would not affect the revenue budget of the city. Now if we have to raise extra taxes to supplement the revenue budget of the city, we're breaking the commitment that we made.

"So I would caution against all these things, which are essentially increases in taxation."