Worcester Warriors have revealed their new club crest, which will feature on the club's playing shirts next season.

The logo - known as The Warrior - will replace the old image which, it was said, did not reproduce well on television or in newspapers and was not as powerful as the logos belonging to other sides in the Guinness Premiership.
 
The club says it fulfils one of its "primary objectives" which was "to embrace the future and move forward", which more simply means that it ties in with its plans for a new stadium and its wider ambitions of becoming an established as a force in domestic and European rugby.
 
General manager Charlie Little believes the image's contemporary style better defines the club's "vision and personality" than its predecessor.
 
He added: "We are not a club that makes changes for the sake of it. But we are confident that our supporters will be proud of the new design.
 
"As one of the 12 best rugby teams in the country we deserve to be a premium brand and therefore everything we do should be of the highest standard.
 
"It's not just doing it on the pitch; it is the whole culture, impression, service and feeling that you have from being associated with Warriors.
 
"Brand is a complex matter - it is not just the visual identity but also the values. We want everyone's response to us to be that we are a company, rugby team and business that they want to be associated with. The brand reflects all of that."
 
A Worcester-based company - Modus Creative - has been working with the club for the past few months to develop the new image.
 
Mr Little added: "We've gone out to our supporters and gained an understanding of what they feel is important to them and what our values should be.
 
"You only need to look at recent events such as the Kukri kit and sponsorship deal and the multi-million pound East Stand development to realise how this club can develop in the future.
 
"We employed a local company who know the city to oversee the focus groups, interviews with fans and the identity.
 
"Our old brand lost some of its clarity and consistency when it was reproduced on a smaller scale.
 
"It's important to us that whenever people see our visual identity that they always get the same impression.
 
"We feel that is now the case."