A furious carer has hit out at Walsall Council amid claims the authority rejected a company's offer to take on the axed community alarm service because of GDPR rules.

Amy Wolfs said personal alarm company SureSafe had contacted the council and was prepared to take on the service - for which funding has been cut as a result of budget savings - and charge users just 39p a day.

But she said the offer was turned down by the authority due to fears that passing on service users details would breach privacy rules.

Carer and mother-of-two Amy Wolfs at the protest against budget cuts outside Walsall Council House on Monday, January 7.
Carer and mother-of-two Amy Wolfs at the protest against budget cuts outside Walsall Council House on Monday, January 7.
 

Mother-of-two Mrs Wolfs, whose husband David has multiple sclerosis, said the deal would have been a smooth transition and offered the cheapest alternative and added she felt like vulnerable people were being "attacked" by the council.

A Walsall Council spokesman said the authority was committed to protecting the privacy of service users and wanted to ensure they had a wide choice for alternative provision.

Authority bosses decided to stop funding the £1.29m non-statutory service in the face of having to make £20 million budget savings. They also said it is no longer fit-for-purpose.

But Mrs Wolfs said: "SureSafe offered to take all the 7,000 plus service users on without having to charge set up costs as they wanted to use the council's equipment.

"This would have cost the council nothing and service users would only have to pay 39p a day for this vital service.

Protesters demonstrate against budget cuts outside Walsall Council House on Monday, January 7.
Protesters demonstrate against budget cuts outside Walsall Council House on Monday, January 7.
 

"But SureSafe said they were refused because of GDPR. The council could easily have contacted all the service users to ask if they were happy to share their information but it seems as if they have just washed their hands of us.

"It's now beginning to feel like an attack on all of us. There is no evidence of them wanting to help.

"We have not been given the supported transition by the council that we were assured we'd get.

"We only had those letters which told us to take unused equipment to the tip and listed a number of alternative providers, who are all more expensive than SureSafe."

Mrs Wolfs will be leading a protest against the decision to cut the alarms funding ahead of a special cabinet meeting on Wednesday (January 23).

The Council House in Walsall town centre
The Council House in Walsall town centre
 

A Walsall Council spokesman said: "We are aware a number of providers have shown an interest in working with people that use the council’s Community Alarm Service.

"Many of these providers are able to offer a seamless transition in service.

"We are keen that people have a real choice in provider. Decisions around which provider will best meet an individual’s needs are best made by the service user, and we are actively working with people that require support to help them make the most informed choice.

"The council is committed to protecting the privacy of service users and will never provide service users’ personal data to third parties without a lawful basis."