Fewer than half of working-age disabled people in Birmingham have jobs, new figures reveal - with campaigners saying more must be done to help them into work

Some 117,500 people aged between 16 and 64 in Birmingham were recorded as being disabled in 2017/18.

But just 51,500 of them - or 43.8 per cent - had jobs.

That is according to new figures from the Labour Force Survey and published by Public Health England.

The figures reveal just how much having a disability affects your odds of being employed.

Among people without a disability, 413,400 - or nearly seven in 10 - had a job.

Campaigners said the figures showed that employers were missing out on a "massive pool of disabled talent".

The proportion of disabled people in jobs, while low, has actually risen slightly.

In 2016/17, only 38.7 per cent of people with a disability were in work.

The situation in Birmingham reflects a national trend.

Across England, 6.2 million people aged between 16 and 64 in England were recorded as being disabled in 2017/18.

Barely half - 3.2 million of them - had jobs.

At the same time, 22.9 million without a disability - or more than eight in 10 - had a job.

Westminster in London had the worst rate of employment among disabled people in England in 2017/18.

 

Fewer than a third (30.8 per cent) of working-age adults with a disability had jobs there.

Hartlepool (32.6 per cent), Nottingham (35 per cent), and Tower Hamlets in London (35.7 per cent) also had very low rates of employment among disabled working-age adults.

Buckinghamshire, on the other hand, had the highest employment rate among working age disabled people, at 76.9 per cent.

 

Jess Leigh, policy manager at disability equality charity, Scope, said: “Employers are missing out on a massive pool of disabled talent.

“Inclusive workplaces allow everyone thrive, there are lots of straightforward actions that businesses can take.

“We’re calling on businesses to sign our #WorkWithMe pledge to create more inclusive workplaces for disabled people.”

The DWP was contacted for comment.