Birmingham’s canalside live music venue The Flapper has announced it will cease trading in June.

But the fight to save it from becoming an apartment block goes on, backed by a petition signed by more than 11,000 supporters.

Last June, developer Will Adams revealed plans to build a £10 million, 12-storey, 66-home flat block in place of the The Flapper, a pub which was designed to respect the sense of open space in the area.

But residents in six nearby Grade II listed Georgian cottages say they would be badly affected.

Redevelopment plans suggest a listed crane outside the Flapper and Firkin would be kept if the pub makes way for a block of flats
Redevelopment plans suggest a listed crane outside the Flapper and Firkin would be kept if the pub makes way for a block of flats

A new five year-lease between the developer and The Flapper began last spring, with the first break clause coming round on June 30 this year, the date now earmarked for The Flapper’s potential closure.

The period for planning application comments from members of the public and other parties interested in the possible redevelopment – including the Canal & River Trust and Music Venue Trust has closed.

This means the future of the pub – which was due to celebrate its 50th anniversary next year – is now dependent on Mr Adam’s plans being given the go-ahead by councillors, with no known set date for when that might be.

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Inside the main bar of the Flapper and Firkin
Inside the main bar of The Flapper pub

A management statement said on behalf of The Flapper: “It is with heavy hearts that we announce that Saturday, June 30, 2018 will be our last day of trade.

“We would like to clarify that it will be business as usual up until this date.

“Redevelopment plans are still being deliberated by Birmingham City Council; they have currently not been passed.

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Upstairs at The Flapper
Upstairs at The Flapper

“When we hear of any further news regarding the plans we will publish them via our social media sites and website.”

The statement added that a commemorative celebration was being organised in honour of The Flapper – and its previous incarnations as The Flapper and Firkin and The Longboat – to include special events and bands playing possibly the last gigs within the venue.

It added: “We’d like to ask for sensitivity towards our staff at this time. We look forward to seeing you all and hope you come and enjoy The Flapper for the few months she has left.

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Will Adams, managing director of development managers Whitehorse Estates Ltd
Will Adams, managing director of development managers Whitehorse Estates Ltd

“Birmingham Promoters are currently organising the last ever shows; and questions or queries please email info@birminghampromoters.com “Please understand they are extremely busy at this time and will get back to you as soon as they can, we won’t be able to answer any booking related questions.”

The statement was issued by the family which runs The Flapper and their pub manager, Karl Scott, said nobody was giving up the fight to keep the pub alive.

“There are so many groups with great reasons why the pub should still be saved even now,” he said.

"We remain hopeful things may change and and further information will be given as soon as they have it via our social media sites.

"We aren’t going anywhere before that date and will be having many gigs and events in the time before June to celebrate the pubs history, heritage and it’s community."

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The Flapper and Firkin

The Flapper Appreciation Society’s Paul Morgan added: “I did feel that (the statement) was a tad negative, but they do have to plan for the worst and hope for the best.

“We need the Music Venue Trust now more than ever, as even if the planning application gets declined we need to keep the Flapper open, the family run business in situ and the developer off of our door.

“The case is still being looked at by Historic England and we hope the building will be listed, but in the meantime we can only keep up the fight and hope for the best.”

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A door covered in band stickers leading into the live music room at The Flapper
A door covered in band stickers leading into the live music room at The Flapper

Dr Ted Hiscock, who lives in one of the Georgian cottages, said: “There are many facets of objections to this proposal but for me, one of the added dimensions that has to be considered is the utter lack of consideration for the six Grade II listed Georgian mews houses in Kingston Row, a mere 12 metres from the proposed building site.

“Daylight in two of them would be utterly obliterated.”

City centre resident Mr Morgan, who independently organised the petition via the Flapper Appreciation Society, added: “I am still confident of a happy result.

“We have many irons in many fires and are still positive of a happy outcome.

“The Flapper lady has not yet sung her last, so it’s business as usual until further notice. Keep the faith.”

A spokesperson for Whitehorse Estates Ltd said: “Whilst we know that this will be seen as an end of an era for some, we also recognise that this part of Birmingham is changing rapidly. This site is now best suited for residential use and this is an opportunity to deliver new homes in the heart of Birmingham.

“The site has been earmarked for regeneration for nearly a decade and as owners we have been clear about our intention to redevelop the site since we purchased it."