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Funding to expand Tolkien's favourite nature spot

The Wildlife Trust for Birmingham and the Black Country has secured more than £40,000 in funding to continue their work in making Moseley Bog and Joy’s Wood one of the most accessible nature reserves in the area

Rod Fox playing Gandalf at the entrance to Moseley Bog

A nature reserve which inspired JRR Tolkien is to be expanded to include a forgotten meadow area.

The Wildlife Trust for Birmingham and the Black Country has secured more than £40,000 in funding to continue their work in making Moseley Bog and Joy’s Wood one of the most accessible nature reserves in the area.

The "forgotten meadow" will link the site to Sarehole Mill and the rest of The Shire Country Park, where JRR Tolkien played as a young boy.

The project has been funded by Biffa Award, a multi-million pound environment fund managed by the Royal Society of Wildlife Trusts (RSWT), which uses landfill tax credits donated by Biffa Waste Services.

Volunteers will be involved in creating walkways using natural materials through the new area of the reserve as well as doing conservation work that will bring this unloved and ignored part of the site up to the same standard as the rest of the reserve.

Jack Wilson, chair of the Wildlife Trust for Birmingham and the Black Country, said: “We are delighted that we have now secured the funding for this work that will make a big difference to local users of the site.

“We have already made much of Moseley Bog and Joy’s Wood easy to access while still retaining its unique feel and to bring in another special area is great for local people and wildlife.

“We feel it is important that the other areas which need attention are opened up and the residents living around the Pensby Close entrance feel connected to the Reserve, too.”

Biffa Award programme manager Gillian French said: "Biffa Award is keen to support projects which improve access to reserves and woodland and encourage us to learn more about our natural environment.

“This project does both and the improvements will mean that more people will be able to enjoy the trail throughout the year.”

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