House sellers living in Headley Heath near Solihull are in the money, as prices have jumped by more than half there in just a year.

But it means house buyers wanting to live there had to spend more after the median price (the midway point of all homes sold) in the B38 0 postcode went up from £120,000 in 2014, to £187,000, in 2015. That is a £67,000 or 56 per cent rise, according to the figures released by the Land Registry.

This far outstrips increases in other areas, including the B15 1 postcode, near Edgbaston, where prices went up by a third. In 2014 the median figure was £130,000 while in 2015 it was £170,000.

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A typical house on sale for £765,000 in Icknield Street, Headley Heath, where prices have risen dramatically.
A typical house on sale for £765,000 in Icknield Street, Headley Heath, where prices have risen dramatically.

In Birmingham city centre, properties in the B3 2 postcode, which is near Church Street, rose from £90,000 in 2014, to £117,000 in 2015 – a 31 per cent rise.

Changes in price may be due to more demand pushing them up or a different type of property being sold in the area, particularly if new homes have been built.

The data also revealed the most expensive postcode in the Birmingham area, which is Olton in Solihull.

The median price for homes with a B94 5 address is more than half a million pounds – £525,000 in 2015.

However, even these impressive figures pale in comparison to the biggest price rise in 2015, which could be found in London.

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A typical house on sale for £765,000 in Icknield Street, Headley Heath, where prices have risen dramatically.
A typical house on sale for £765,000 in Icknield Street, Headley Heath, where prices have risen dramatically.

A £17m flat sale at One Hyde Park saw median prices jump from £2.1m in 2014 to £5.8m in 2015 in SW1X 7, around Belgravia and Knightsbridge.

That is an incredible 176 per cent in 12 months.

Interestingly that percentage increase was nearly matched in L1 9, around Rodney Street in Liverpool city centre.

Median prices were up there by 175.5 per cent from £132,500 in 2014 to £365,000 in 2015, as sales swapped from cheaper flats to houses.